The biodiversity of the ocean is under attack – by humans.

Without taking action now, fish and other marine life won’t be able to repopulate to a healthy number in order to meet demands.

For years, commercial fishing has been in action around the world, but never to the extent the last 40 years has brought. Around 39% of marine life have decreased in numbers due to overfishing.1 This is simply unacceptable and unnecessary.

Increasing demand for fish and other marine life means more and more species are becoming endangered, threatened or even close to extinction. This is due to bycatches – which is when other marine life like sharks, dolphins and whales are caught in nets and die as a result.2

29% of global fish populations are overfished.3

With the global population set to increase to 9.7 billion by 2050, now is the time to ensure we stop overfishing to prevent species extinction, world food shortages and unnecessary bycatches.

Together we can make a global commitment to ban deep trawling and increase sustainable fishing practices around the world. Every country needs to play their part and by helping do your part, you can make a difference too.

Too many people are unaware of the damaging fishing practices that take place today including millions of fish being caught illegally without regulation.

Without serious changes, 84 percent of the world’s fish stocks will be on the brink of no return in our lifetime.4

You need to act now

Commit to the fight for sustainable fishing and ban bottom trawling so that our oceans can have a future and our planet can survive.

Take the 2-minute quiz to find out how much you already know about the dire impacts of overfishing.

Sources:
1. https://pasopacifico.org/project/marine-conservation
2. https://www.wwf.org.au/what-we-do/oceans/bycatch#gs.qy3c38
3. https://www.fishforward.eu/en/topics/facts-figures/
4. https://www.natureaustralia.org.au/what-we-do/our-insights/perspectives/three-ways-to-save-earth/
Photo Credit: "File:Trawlers overfishing cod.jpg" (https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47649770) by Asc1733 is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en).